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Archive for the ‘LCCN’ Category

Format of LCCN

Q:  Regarding the formatting of LCCNs, should we have a dash after the first two digits? Or should we replace that dash with a zero?

A:  You can do either.

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Q.  For one of the Exercise 2 titles, I could not find a LCCN with the book.  Does this mean I delete that tag, even though it is in the OCLC record?

A.  If there is no LCCN in the book, then yes, you can delete the tag.

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What is the LCCN?

Q.  What’s the LCCN? 

 A.  Library of Congress Control Number.  It is a unique number for each record in the database. They have been assigning these numbers for more than 100 years.  See the 010 tag in MARC.

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Q.  What is the best way to search OCLC Connexion?

 A. Searching by ISBN should come first.  But many of these titles do not have an ISBN, so then what?  The next best search is LCCN. Don’t forget about the LCCN. If you find one the book, you need to add it to your records. 

 Searching by title will give you too many options. You will need to narrow with date and author, and to check for the correct publisher.

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Q. Why does it have a 010 and a 020 field in the OCLC record? (Summers)

A. You must add the LCCN if you have it. Recheck OCLC for your record. You may be looking at the wrong record. Check you pub date and publisher. And the correct title. There is another title that comes up ahead of the correct title if you just search the title and author. It is very important that you start with the right record.

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Weisinger’s floating number

Q. For the Weisinger title, a third of the way down there is a floating number with CIP under it, does this number get recorded in MARC?

A. There is an LCCN in the CIP blurb. Remember LCCNs are close to the pub date.

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Samson & LCCN

Q. Can we assume the 84-…number on the t.p. verso of the Samson book is the LCCN?

A. Yes. Some one whited out the CIP blurb, but the LCCN is still there.

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